adblue availability in South and Central America

LeZeau

New Overlander
Nov 9, 2020
3
0
1
Hi all,

We drive a European Toyota Hilux Euro 6 2.5 Diesel pop up camper.
Every 1500 km (about 1000 miles) we need to refill our adblue.
In Europe this isn't a big deal, you can find adblue in every petrol station.
But we plan to travel the world with this car, so I wanted to check the availability of adblue in Africa and South-America.

Can you easily get it at every petrol station or do you think this will be a problem?

Thanks,
Jo
 

Cloud 9

New Overlander
May 3, 2020
9
0
1
Hi Jo

The simple answer is no, its not that easy in South America

You will definitely have to carry some and plan your journey really carefully.

If there is any way you can get around its need I would explore that. A range of 1500 km is very limiting.

The added problem you might have is that some countries have dreadful quality diesel. In Bolivia, for example, the diesel is jet black. its so thick that no light passes through it. A refined engine might have some issues with its very poor quality.

Altitude is another factor you might want think about. Some top end euro rated engines dont naturally like to go over 3000m and may need a bit of adjustment for the high altitude passes and planes .

Apps like Ioverlander might help you with locating adblue

Neil
 

LeZeau

New Overlander
Nov 9, 2020
3
0
1
Thank you Cloud 9,

The 'dirty diesel' problem is indeed also an issue. I am now researching which countries have which sulfurlimit and how much the Hilux would be able to 'take'.
Altitude is apparently less of a problem for diesels than petrol cars.
--> Five myths about diesel engines | Argonne National Laboratory
--> MIT School of Engineering | » Which engine is better at high altitude: diesel or gasoline?
But it's difficult to find info on the maximum altitude for a Euro6 car. The highest point we'll want to cross are Atacama desert (2500-3000m) and the panamerica in Costa Rica at 3350m. I'll assume that this will still be possible. Some sources say that you lose 1% of power per 100m (30ft) of altitude, so about 30-35% power loss at 3350m...

kind regards
 

Cloud 9

New Overlander
May 3, 2020
9
0
1
This interesting, Although I have never researched petrol vehicle I have always been led to believe that they coped better at altitude than the diesels.

I think Turbo diesels do better than normally aspirated.

3000m is relatively lowland in South America . Crossing the Andes will often take you up to 4500 to 5000m . An example being from san Pedro de Atacama to Argentina is near 5000m

Restricting yourselves to 3000m or less will exclude you from some of the most beautiful places

At 5000m I am probably running on 40% power and the smoke is terrible , but it manages it

Neil